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Trucking Basics: What are DVIRs and am I required to keep one?

DVIR stands for driver vehicle inspection report. Drivers are supposed to check their vehicle before and after driving to make sure everything is in order. Property carrying vehicles: A formal DVIR is only required when a vehicle issue/defect is reported to the driver or found by the driver. If a defect is found, the driver…

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HOS Rules: The 6 Essentials HOS violations impact CSA scores. Knowing the 6 essential HOS rules though can save your fleet time and money. Drivers who comply with these basic standards can avoid most issues with law enforcement.

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34-Hour Restart

If you want to completely refresh your driving cycle and clear all “rolling” hours, all you have to do is take 34 consecutive hours off-duty. The 34-hour restart has gone through some changes over the past year. Most recently, the requirement to log two off-duty periods between 1AM and 5AM within the 34-hour period was…

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Sleeper Berth Extension

Freeze your 14-hour window by applying the sleeper berth extension.   The 14-hour rule puts pressure on drivers to minimize their breaks so they can maximize their drive time before having to take the required 10-hour break.  The only way to extend the 14-hour window without having to take 10 hours off-duty is by logging…

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Split Sleeper Berth

What is the purpose of the Split Sleeper Berth rule? The Split Sleeper Berth provision means flexibility for a driver. It allows a driver to split the required 10 consecutive hour off-duty break into two shifts. One shift must be between 2 and 8 hours, and can be spent in the sleeper berth or off duty…

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Cycles: 60/7 & 70/8

If you’re familiar with the trucking industry, you’ve most likely heard of the 60-hour/7-day or 70-hour/8-day cycle. The 60-hour/7-day cycle limits a driver to 60 hours of on-duty time during a 7-day window, while the 70-hour/8-day cycle limits a driver to 70 hours  of on-duty time over an 8-day period.   The 8-day and 7-day…

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DOT Trucking Rules: 30-Minute Break

The 30-minute break is often misunderstood by truckers. A full-proof way to avoid HOS violations is to think about what you cannot do instead of what you can do. A driver cannot drive after any 8-hour period on-duty, until he or she takes the required 30-minute off-duty break. Remaining on duty after the 8 hours…

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11-Hour & 14-Hour Rule

The 14-Hour Rule When a driver comes on duty after taking at least 10 consecutive hours off duty, he has a 14-hour window to complete his driving for the day.  Although you cannot drive after the 14th hour, you can be on duty to perform other work-related duties.  A violation can only occur while driving….